Quezon City Brief History


In 1938, President Quezon purchased 1,529 hectares from the vast Diliman Estate of the Tuason Family. The following year, the National Assembly enacted the Commonwealth Act otherwise known as the Charter of Quezon City.
On October 12, 1939, President Quezon signed the Bill into law, thus the city was born. Progress in Quezon City continued until the outbreak of World War II in 1941.

Quezon City (Filipino: Lungsod Quezon) is the former capital (1948–1976) and the most populous city in the Philippines. Located on the island of Luzon, Quezon City (popularly known to Filipinos as simply QC) is one of the cities and municipalities that make up Metro Manila, the National Capital Region. The city was named after Manuel L. Quezon, the former president of the Commonwealth of the Philippines who founded the city and developed it to replace Manila as the country’s capital. Quezon City is not located in and should not be confused with Quezon province, which was also named after the president.

Having been the former capital, many government offices are located in the city, including the Batasang Pambansa, the seat of the House of Representatives, which is the lower chamber in the Philippine Congress. The main campuses of two noteworthy universities, the Ateneo de Manila University and the country’s National University—the University of the Philippines, Diliman—are located in the city.

At Diliman’s center lies the Quezon Memorial Circle the landmark of the city where the late President Manuel L. Quezon is interred. The monument, encased in marble, is the highest structure in that part of the city. Running around the monument is the two-kilometer Quezon Memorial Circle, also known as the Elliptical Road (R-7/C-5). The circle links Commonwealth (R-7/C-5), Visayas, Kalayaan, East, North(C-5), and Quezon Avenues (R-7). The last three avenues provide access to Epifanio delos Santos Avenue (EDSA) (C-4), the main highway in Metro Manila.

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